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  • BA Psychology - Social scientist to science communicator

    Name :Lori Palen (she/her) Job title:Owner & Principal Consultant at Data Soapbox, a research communication firm A levels/ equivalent :N/A Undergrad and post grad degrees : Bachelor of Arts in Psychology, The College of William & Mary Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in Human Development and Family Studies, The Pennsylvania State University Favourite science fact: For a woman who has had biological children, her children’s DNA can be found in her body even decades after their birth -> read more Journey in 3 Words :Practitioner, scientist, communicator Briefly describe yourself ? I’m a trained social scientist. Including graduate school, I spent 17 years as an adolescent health researcher, studying the prevention of risk behaviors like substance abuse, sexual risk behavior, and relationship violence. As my career progressed, I got more and more interested in the back end of the research process, when findings are shared with people who can use them. I eventually decided to pursue research communication full time. I couldn’t find an existing opportunity that worked for me, so I made my own! In early 2021, I started Data Soapbox, a research communication firm. We design products like reports, presentations, and infographics for clients in the research, education, and human service spaces. How did you know a PhD was for you? Honestly, I wasn’t initially sure! I had worked in substance abuse treatment for a couple of years and knew I wanted to go back to school to learn about preventing risk behaviors before they start. I found out that I could pay to go to a master’s degree program, or I could get paid (through a graduate assistantship) to get a PhD. I figured that graduating without student loans (and being “Dr. Palen”!) was worth a few additional years of school. My program ended up being a good fit, I learned a lot, and it positioned me well for the work I do now. As a social scientist, What is your biggest pet peeve about how the world perceives your field ? I get irked that social science, either explicitly or by omission, sometimes gets framed as being “less” than the natural sciences, like biology, chemistry, and physics. (You can read my comprehensive rant about this issue here.) As the COVID-19 pandemic has shown us, biochemical vaccine research tells us nothing about how to get people to show up for the shots. Questions about human behavior (including how to predict and change it) are critical to our health and well-being, and brilliant people are attempting to answer those questions in rigorous ways. " Communication was the area in which I got to shine, and when you shine in something that you also enjoy, it’s pretty appealing to make that your specialty. " How did academia treat you and what motivated the transition to communication ? (I wasn’t really in academia after graduate school; I worked at a non-profit research institute.) At the research institute where I worked, I was (understandably, and completely logically) expected to “do research,” which meant engaging in the whole process of study design, execution, and reporting. I worked with a lot of talented researchers who could run circles around me when it came to theory, study design, and data analysis. Communication was the area in which I got to shine, and when you shine in something that you also enjoy, it’s pretty appealing to make that your specialty. Starting a business in a pandemic isn’t easy, how do you manage Work- Life Balance as the word transitions into this “new normal”? Starting a business in the midst of a pandemic was tough! I originally planned to launch Data Soapbox in summer 2020, but all of my bandwidth was taken up with physical, emotional, and economic survival. By the end of 2020, it felt like things had settled down enough that leaving my stable, well-paying job wouldn’t be a complete disaster. I have two sons, ages 6 and 9, one with major health and education challenges. By necessity, my default work-family balance leans heavily family, so for me the challenge is carving out dedicated time to work. Having my own business gives me maximum flexibility in when, where, and how I do my job. I can be available for parent-teacher conferences and doctor’s appointments and lunch with my parents, and I can do focused communication work when my kids are sleeping or in someone else’s care. What experiences had the most impact on your current career trajectory? And specifically internships? I attended an Edward Tufte workshop in 2007, and it was the first time I’d ever heard someone present alternatives to traditional academic/scientific communication. Over the years, I soaked up books and internet resources about effective communication, including content from Stephanie Evergreen, Nancy Duarte, Garr Reynolds, Cole Nussbaumer Knaflic, and Randy Olson. When I started planning to start my business, I took community college classes in graphic design and journalism to further build my skills. What transferrable skills do you use from your degrees now in your current role? Lots of them! My university education taught me how to digest scientific literature, interpret statistics, think critically, and write clearly and logically. And then, even though I’m no longer active in conducting research, that part of my training helps me better understand my clients’ goals, resources, and constraints. Which resources helped you most during your career journey? I’d previously mentioned the big names in the field who helped me make the pivot from research to research communication. Unfortunately, I didn’t get much exposure to science communication best practices and careers when I was in school. Now I see all sorts of interesting student opportunities, which make me excited for the next generation of science communicators. "rejection is the price we pay for taking chances " What advice would you give on dealing with rejection and perseverance? I love this question! In this age of seeing everyone’s highlight reels on social media, we need to be talking more about rejection and failure. In graduate school alone, I was rejected for the first conference I ever applied to, multiple journal manuscripts, my first two dissertation proposals, my NIH dissertation grant proposal, my first predoctoral fellowship proposal, and all but two jobs I applied to. I also got rejected by (counting on my fingers) at least half a dozen guys. And there are some times when rejection really hurts...when it’s something that you expected to get, when it’s something you really wanted to have, when it’s something that everyone you know got. But, rejection is the price we pay for taking chances. There are a few things that help me cope with rejection. Taking some time to sulk about it. (Things usually look better with some time and distance.) Using the rejection as motivation to kick ass at the next thing I try. Filling my life with people and things I love, so that post-rejection life is still pretty great. But, I’ve never stopped taking chances, even if I have to assess whether I should try for something different next time. When considering your career path, how much has your potential salary affected your decision For the most part, potential salary hasn’t had much impact on my career decisions. However, there are a couple of exceptions. I worked in human services for two years after undergrad, and part of what pushed me back to graduate school was the realization that I wanted to make more than $11.35 an hour. And then, when I worked as a researcher, the good salary made it harder to decide to venture into the unknowns of entrepreneurship. Outside science how would you describe yourself? I’m a mom, wife, daughter, and sister. I’m also an avid reader and an arts-and-crafts enthusiast. I can be serious when I need to, but I’d rather be laughing.

  • Biomedicine to Life sciences content creator and strategist

    Name - Nidhi Parekh (she/her) Current role - Life sciences content creator and strategist at The Shared Microscope A levels/ equivalent -- I did the International Baccalaureate. Undergrad and postgrad degrees - BSc in Biomedicine (from the University of East Anglia, Norwich) and a Graduate Diploma in Law (from BPP University, London) Favourite science fact - We don’t all see colours in the exact same way! [whaaaat] Journey in 3 Words - Convoluted. Hopeful. Exciting. What motivated you to pursue a career in science - I always thought I wanted to positively impact people’s lives through studying medicine. I haven’t got to live that dream (yet) but definitely have had the chance to change lives with what I do now. Briefly describe your role I am a freelance website content creator and strategist for the life sciences and health niche. My role involves writing life sciences content that many people rely on to make important decisions about their health and wellbeing. You recently worked in law and have now gone back to science, what was your role like previously and what inspired the change? I really enjoyed my role in the field of law, but it didn’t seem to be making the impact I was hoping for. While I was working in law, I found some lumps on my breast (it took me forever to get them checked -- all turned out okay). I wrote more about this experience here. While working in law, I also periodically came across clients that had limited health literacy and had trouble understanding the harmful effects of smoking, or how to manage their blood sugar, for example. Together, these experiences showed me that there was a real requirement to create accessible and impactful health content to get people to understand health and medicine, and more particularly, take preventive measures to protect from certain health conditions. How have internships impacted your career journey ? I think internships were a great way for me to understand what it is that I like. I did an internship at the John Innes Center that was funded by the Lister Institute of Preventive Medicine. I learnt through that internship that I did not particularly enjoy laboratory work. I also did an internship at a law firm in London, which I enjoyed, but through it I was able to learn the areas of law that I did enjoy - intellectual property, occupational disease, family law, etc. What transferable skills have you found most valuable from your degree ? My most transferable skill from the sciences has been to be able to conduct research and distinguish between good sources and bad sources. The law degree really helped hone my communication skills. What advice would you give anyone wanting to follow your career path You can consume as much information you want from books and courses, but none of them will teach you what real life experiences will! Just begin this “dream job” of yours and learn on the go! A little bit each day really goes a long way. What advice would you give on networking and putting yourself out there on social media? I definitely think networking on social media is worth it. It can help you get clients and also help build your circle - whether that be for SciComm, freelancing, or something else. You can quickly find your people on social media. If you are looking to network with people within SciComm, definitely come and drop in to our #SciCommChat sessions every Wednesday at 6pm GMT. The community is super friendly, approachable and helpful. Learn more about how you can join #SciCommChat here. You run two platforms @thesharedscope (@thesharedmicroscope on Instagram) and @scicomm.club. What was the inspiration behind these and what are your long term plans for these projects? I started @thesharedscope as part of my blog for improving health literacy. This has now become a business and my main source of income - I write impactful and accessible health content for biotech and health companies, and other industries within the life sciences. The inspiration for The Shared Microscope came from my own breast cancer scare and recognizing a gap in what doctors knew and what patients understood. The long-term plan with TSM is to continue to create a place for accurate and reliable health information either for the TSM blog or for blogs of clients. I hope to do this on a larger scale, with larger health/biotech companies as well as start-up companies looking to make a positive difference. I started @SciComm.Club to fill another need in the market - a need that science and health communicators have had for a while but has been particularly highlighted by the COVID-19 pandemic. We need more science communicators! And we need them all to talk with each other and others to improve our communication with each other and the general public. I started @SciComm.Club to create a space for science communicators and others interested in science communication to talk and learn from each other to collectively hone our skills and make our communications more effective. Where do you see yourself in 5 years I’d like to be working with top clients in the field while helping start-ups get to the top. I would also like to “give back” to the community by opening a free clinic for preventive health. Through this, I hope to educate people about the effect of food on our health, family planning and safe sex, and also work with a period charity to empower women to make their own period products and sell these products to help them make money. Outside science how would you describe yourself I’m quite a chatty person who is always looking to make a positive difference in the world.

  • Bsc Life Science to Msc Agricultural science

    Name: Mishumo Nemathaga Course :Masters of Science in Agriculture candidate A levels/ equivalent :National Senior Certificate (Life Science, Physical Science, Geography, Mathematics and English) Graduate degrees: Bachelor of Science in Life Sciences (Microbiology and Zoology stream) Honours in Life Sciences (Microbiology stream) Favourite science fact: Microbes are 10 times more than the number of human cells in a living human. Journey in 3 Words : Purposeful, Inspirational, maturing Briefly describe your role or course I am currently a Masters candidate at the University of South Africa focusing on Animal sciences. My research is on Ascaridia galli parasitic roundworms that cause fatal diseases in chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus). My research work will help provide healthy food to rural communities that rely on poultry for their livelihood, and furthermore contribute to the global goal of combating hunger in Africa. What motivated you to pursue a career in science? My primary education really shaped me and introduced me to subjects that opened my young mind. My love for science started when I was in primary school (Grade 6). I really enjoyed the lessons and mini-projects that I had to do during my Life Science and Technology classes. I started to have a greater interest in Life Science as a subject. The mini-projects that the teacher gave of mammals, reptiles and the ecosystem gave me a reason to find myself searching the internet looking for the meaning of life sciences. Internet Explorer gave me a definition that changed my future goal, dreams and desires forever. The explanation spoke of living things and even gave examples of animals and small organisms. I continued to search until I saw the word “biologist” and the definition fascinated me so much. I decided then and there that when I am grown up, I want to become a biologist. I went home that day and told my mom about my ambition. The reason why I pursued an academic journey in microbiology, zoology and even agriculture was due to my 12 year-old self!T I stepped out in faith and walked into the unknown, my courage, ambition and drive for something challenging brought me this far and I hope that my story will give a young girl child the ability to see a scientist in herself because it is possible. What advice would you give someone wanting to study the same degree? I have come across so many challenges and also found myself in situations that would force me to question my academic choices but I always told myself “fail but never fail to try again”. Take the journey with an open mind and willingness to learn from your mistakes. It is also important to know that challenges are there to make you stronger. Believe in yourself and your abilities. Set goals, aspirations, interests and values and follow them. In the STEM world we learn from those who pursued it before us, they are the best mentors. Also remember that we make academic choices on a daily basis so don’t be afraid to aim for greater heights (don’t limit yourself). What do you enjoy the most about your masters course ? I am conducting research that will contribute positively to the global goal of combating hunger and my research will impact rural areas and empower farmers. I enjoy the fact that my research is not only for my gain, but for a global contribution. I have a passion to make a difference in Africa through research and more research, and I believe that success doesn't compare to making a generational difference. What advice would you give on dealing with rejection and perseverance? I have personally learnt that rejections don't define you, self-growth does. With every rejection redefine yourself, redefine your surroundings and learn that you are stronger. We all know that perseverance is the mother of success. Furthermore the reason why it is a virtue is because perseverance is a strength within courage followed by bravery, honesty, and zest. Believe in yourself and your abilities and GO FOR IT (zest), remember that you are intelligent and a force to be reckoned with (bravery) work hard and never be afraid to ask questions, you can never live long enough to know everything (honesty) and most importantly always remember that in the STEM world we learn from those who pursued it before us they are the greatest mentors so “persevere’. What is your biggest pet peeve about how the world perceives science ? That science is for nerds. I have personally experienced the nerd stigma throughout my academic journey. It's very interesting how people actually think that as a scientist you should know everything under the sun. Outside science how would you describe yourself ? I'm a very spiritual person, I come from a Christian family. I describe myself outside of Science as a worshipper and a very loving person. I mostly put others before me, I love the feeling of seeing people around me happy. I am an introvert which is sometimes shocking to other people because I'm very outspoken, but I prefer peace and quiet and my own space. You run a STEM facebook page, what motivated that and how has that impacted your science career? Motivation has come from my journey as a scientist, the challenging moments and days that made me feel like giving up motivated me. I am a Fellow of an organization called Black Women in Science that aims to expose female emerging researchers to research opportunities and science platforms and when I joined the fellowship I wanted to find myself in stimulating environments that had women that walked a similar journey as mine. An environment that would recognize me as a scientist and also provide me with opportunities This organization has given me a better perspective of the STEM world and how unequal it is when it comes to black women. From this journey I have become inspired to create a “let’s have a moment of science” platform that will encourage and impart an interest of the science world to a rural learner. Free Science aspires to deliver mentorship that will encourage great passion for science and break down misconceptions and barriers that surround science. The impact that my page has in my science career is very positive as I find myself assisting undergraduates and senior phase learners through similar challenges that I faced throughout my journey. I don't try to fix everything but I try to show them that I have overcome the same obstacle, and it is possible. a resilient scientist that's dedicated her research journey to contributing to the solidification of solutions that can impact agricultural diversity and continue to improve the lives of people equally. Where do you see yourself in 5 years? In the next 5 years I see myself as Dr Mishumo Nemathaga, a resilient scientist that's dedicated her research journey to contributing to the solidification of solutions that can impact agricultural diversity and continue to improve the lives of people equally. I also see myself furthering my academic journey into pathology as my passion also lies in contributing to detection of diseases and conducting research that can prevent the spread of deadly diseases. I furthermore believe that success doesn't compare to making a generational difference, so I would also like to inspire the next generation and become a mentor that will encourage conceptual thinkers that believe in their abilities. I want to see myself seen by others as proof that your aspirations, dreams and goals are valid. Feel free to reach out to Mishumo on socials. Social media handles Instagram:n_mish22 Facebook page link https://www.facebook.com/mishumo.nemathaga Facebook page Free Science https://www.facebook.com/FreeScience101 LinkedIn linkedin.com/in/mishumo-nemathaga-05b5a11ba

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  • Should I do a Phd? l TCIM

    Umu Wurie Biomed to LLM Legal Practice Elicia Fyle Scientific Officer, institute of cancer research. Lynn- Asanate Are Visiting Scientists and Medical Student Allan Campbell Molecular scientist Adama Fullah Pharmacovigilance Business Consultant to Medical Consultant Rachel-Lambert Forsythe Chied Executive British Pharmacological Society Oluwasuen Ogundele Msci Biochemistry to Research assistant at Cambridge Merissa Brown Bsc Biomedical science to Psychology conversion Msc Adama Sep 14 5 min BA Psychology - Social scientist to science communicator I’m a trained social scientist. Including graduate school, I spent 17 years as an adolescent health researcher. 9 views 0 comments Post not marked as liked Adama Apr 21 4 min Biological science (Medical biology) to Interdisciplinary PhD Name : Ramota Adelakun Current Title: PhD Student A levels/ equivalent : Biology, Chemistry, Maths Undergrad and post grad degrees: Bsc... 30 views 0 comments Post not marked as liked Adama Apr 5 7 min How to write a Dissertation or Thesis How to write a good thesis or dissertation. You will ask yourself this question a few times. A detailed guide on good Bsc and Msc thesis 65 views 0 comments Post not marked as liked Adama Feb 8 3 min Phd to CEO l TCIM Careers I first started out studying at Howard University during my undergraduate years in Biology and Chemistry 12 views 0 comments Post not marked as liked Adama Feb 3 4 min Information, Goals, Decisions l TCIM Career plan In this post, I go through the three points of “The Career Plan” checklist - they somewhat relate so it didn’t make sense to split them up. 1 view 0 comments Post not marked as liked Adama Jan 30 4 min Academia is the ghetto- a letter to my naïve self So you have decided academia is the path you want to follow. Motivated, passionate and ready to put in the work. What could go wrong? 35 views 0 comments 2 likes. Post not marked as liked 2 Adama Nov 15, 2020 4 min Biomedical Science to Phd Cardiovascular scienceI TCIM Careers Name: Jason Amartey Course/ job :PhD Researcher (cardiovascular science) A levels/ equivalent :Biology, Chemistry and Physical Education... 36 views 0 comments 1 like. Post not marked as liked 1 Adama Nov 2, 2020 2 min Biochemistry to Phd Molecular and cell biology Name: Nxalati Mkhombo Course/ job: PhD candidate: Molecular and Cell Biology A levels/ equivalent: Mathematics, Life science, Geography... 20 views 0 comments 1 like. Post not marked as liked 1 Adama Oct 8, 2020 2 min Microbiology to Chief Researcher I TCIM Careers Favourite science fact The average human body carries ten times more bacterial cells than human cells Journey in 3 Words Challenging,... 19 views 0 comments Post not marked as liked Adama Oct 5, 2020 4 min Bioscience to Post doctoral fellow South Africa I TCIM Careers Name : Dr Thato Motlhalamme Course/ job: Postdoctoral fellow at the South African Grape and Wine Research Institute A levels/ equivalent:... 25 views 0 comments Post not marked as liked Adama Aug 5, 2020 6 min Alternative Careers in Science By Sheeva Azma and Nidhi Parekh So you’re a newly minted science graduate, but the idea of becoming a professor is not alluring to you. ... 69 views 0 comments 2 likes. Post not marked as liked 2 Adama Jun 7, 2020 3 min Maintaining Relationships:Networking Building meaningful relationships in any context takes time. Networking is the same as building a friendship, the only thing that differs... 46 views 0 comments 1 like. Post not marked as liked 1 Adama May 20, 2020 6 min Networking We all know networking is important. A lot of us can probably list a few ways to network, but acting on it and strategically expanding... 72 views 0 comments Post not marked as liked Adama Mar 5, 2020 6 min Career Profile - Visiting scientist and graduate medical student I was one of the first students to support Cancer Research UK’s Sponsor a Young Scientist Scheme, where charity supporters would pick a CRUK 53 views 0 comments Post not marked as liked Adama Feb 23, 2020 5 min Career Profile- Phd Health Science and Physics My PhD is in the fields of eHealth, machine learning, computer-vision technology and anatomy. I am lucky enough to teach anatomy and histolo 34 views 0 comments Post not marked as liked Adama Nov 4, 2019 3 min Career Profile:PhD Neurobiology My research project makes use of advanced 3D human stem cell models to study Parkinson’s, the second most common neurodegenerative disease. 52 views 0 comments 1 like. Post not marked as liked 1 Adama Sep 14, 2019 3 min Career Profile : Biosciences PhD I see myself working in cardiovascular research in the industry in order to obtain a vast amount of experience before becoming a lecturer wh 64 views 0 comments 3 likes. Post not marked as liked 3 Adama Aug 4, 2019 2 min A summary of career profiles I took a relatively long break and i think the perfect comeback is a lovely collation of all the people that have contributed to this... 163 views 0 comments 1 like. Post not marked as liked 1 Adama Jan 28, 2019 5 min CAREER PROFILE : PhD Genetics (Malaria vector control) By the end of my BSc, I knew two things: I wanted to do research in a laboratory and I wanted to learn more about Functional Genetics. Howev 100 views 0 comments 3 likes. Post not marked as liked 3 Adama Jan 21, 2019 2 min CAREER PROFILE : PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR I lead a research group investigating the genetics of rare and common disease. In this role I drive and lead specific projects 75 views 2 comments 1 like. Post not marked as liked 1 Adama Dec 3, 2018 6 min Professional Profile : phd( sequencing the genome of Malaria from South East Asia) I am trying to use long read sequencing to find a family of genes in a type of malaria that is only in South East Asia. This form of malaria 52 views 0 comments Post not marked as liked Adama Oct 29, 2018 3 min Professional Profile - phd Immunology My PhD focuses on understanding how Dengue virus escapes our cells immune response. There are 3 billion people at risk of being infected by 71 views 0 comments 1 like. Post not marked as liked 1 Adama Aug 21, 2018 2 min PROFESSIONAL PROFILE- PhD( Cancer Studies and Molecular Medicine) Name: Rachel What do you currently study: PhD in Cancer Studies and Molecular Medicine What a levels did you study : Biology, Chemistry... 22 views 0 comments 1 like. Post not marked as liked 1 Adama Jul 2, 2018 2 min PROFESSIONAL PROFILE -Biomedical Science/ PhD Name: Angatu Role: PhD student A levels: Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Further Mathematics, French Undergraduate degree: Biomedical... 56 views 0 comments 2 likes. Post not marked as liked 2

  • Life science Careers l The Catalyst In Me l United Kingdom

    Amran Research Manager Rahma Sesay Biology Teacher Ramota Adelakun Interdisciplinary Phd - Policy and Biology Bamidele Farinre Senior Biomedical Scientist Danielle Nadin Science Strategy Lead Agricultural science Masters Umu Wurie Biomed to LLM Legal Practice Elicia Fyle Scientific Officer, institute of cancer research. Lynn- Asanate Are Visiting Scientists and Medical Student Adama Saccoh Research Technician / Assistant Allan Campbell Molecular scientist Adama Fullah Pharmacovigilance Business Consultant to Medical Consultant Rachel-Lambert Forsythe Chied Executive British Pharmacological Society Oluwasuen Ogundele Msci Biochemistry to Research assistant at Cambridge Merissa Brown Bsc Biomedical science to Psychology conversion Msc Recent Blog Posts Life science Careers are often not well described to life science graduates. Out of all STEM careers it is hard to find clear information with personal examples. The catalyst in me does all this through interviews and resources that will guide your life science career. Adama Feb 17, 2020 5 min Can life science graduates earn high salaries? Most of the most recent reports across platforms like The telegraph , save the student and BBC in relation to life science graduates, there 355 views 0 comments 5 likes. Post not marked as liked 5 Adama Sep 14 5 min BA Psychology - Social scientist to science communicator I’m a trained social scientist. Including graduate school, I spent 17 years as an adolescent health researcher. 9 views 0 comments Post not marked as liked Adama Sep 5 4 min Biomedicine to Life sciences content creator and strategist I am a freelance website content creator and strategist for the life sciences and health niche. 16 views 0 comments Post not marked as liked Adama Jun 20 5 min Bsc Life Science to Msc Agricultural science I am currently a Masters candidate at focusing on Animal sciences. My research work will help provide healthy food to rural communities. 60 views 0 comments 1 like. Post not marked as liked 1 Adama May 24 5 min Bsc Neuroscience to Science Strategy lead Name ( pronouns): Danielle Nadin (she/her/elle) Course/ job:Science Strategy Lead, Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) -... 9 views 0 comments Post not marked as liked Adama May 10 6 min Bsc Biomedical Science to Operational Lead I manage the work of staff in the lab and support the General Manager in developing a culture. 15 views 0 comments Post not marked as liked

  • Public Perception of science | TCIM

    TCIM MINI PROJECT The Public Perception of Science WHY ? Public Perception of science should always be important. Scientists can be at the forefront of the conversation but small ripples can lead to a massive wave. I decided to start the comversation here as a life science student and health enthusiast figuring out her scientific journey. I want to grow into a scientific career, whatever that looks like, thinking about the people I hope to help. WHAT ? This is my first mini-project and over the course of 6 weeks, I ran a poll over three weeks that gained 149 responses. This webpage is a representation of the thoughts people had. ​ 5 Videos, A blog post series and most importantly an on-going conversation. ​ The videos that didn't make it here can be found on IGTV ​ ​ What has Covid-19 made people more aware of? There were so many areas of science brought up. As expected Virology, Vaccines and Epidemiology were the most mentioned. Many other fields came up, but you'll have to watch the video to find out. Understanding the Covid-19 Infodemic We are living in an age where information is incredibly accesible. It is so easy to spread fake information or get overwhelmed by the vast amount of sometimes opposing opinions. This video explores the famous "whatsapp aunties", scaremongering in the media and everything inbetween. I also talk through how to filter information. Are scientists to be trusted? Anti-Vaccers, Drug Scandals... A common theme in the answers was science being held accountable for the wrong doings. This video highlights well known scandals such as : Tuskagee Syphylis scandal, Thalidomide drug scandal and the use of HeLa cells. It also touches upon wider issues such as contraceptives and the most recent Rabies vaccine scandal in China. ​ Science has a long way to go and that starts with owing up to malpractices as well as adressing diversity issues across the board ( but that is a conversation for another day). ONE YEAR ON... ANOTHER SURVEY This video describes the results of my second survey exploring public perception of science. In the video I discuss what has been learnt a year on from COVID-19 and how scientists, science communicators and the public can better engage with each other. Final Thoughts I had intended to end this project with final words from respondants and how I feel, but as I planned the page I realised the conversation hasn't ended. The world may be returning to some form of normalcy but trust is something that needs to be built. For that to happen there needs to be room for open and changing conversation. ​ So for my final thoughts... I want to continue to share all the things I learn along the way. Navigating my way through an industry that hasn't been kind but at the same time has my heart and has a huge community of people willling to change and "science the right way" ​ Welcome to a new blog series -> TCIM Conversations Adama Apr 5 5 min Public perception of science How does the public perceive science? When I started this in 2020, I didn’t think I would still be this interested in the topic. I am... 14 views 0 comments Post not marked as liked Adama Mar 28 9 min Covid-19- One Year On I started this journey simply talking about what a vaccine was quite early on and then expanding that through multiple blog posts. 5 views 0 comments Post not marked as liked Adama Jan 16 8 min Are Vaccines the only end to the pandemic? In summary, there is no clear answer to this question! Vaccines are a way of easing the effects of the pandemic, but not the only way out. 93 views 0 comments Post not marked as liked Adama Nov 6, 2020 8 min The World Can Handle Covid-19 With Covid news many people find themselves between fed up of the information or have completely switched off. Media reporting can often... 34 views 0 comments 1 like. Post not marked as liked 1 Adama Sep 6, 2020 6 min It's September ... why don't we have a vaccine yet? The past 5 months have been a whirlwind . The seemingly race/ sprint for a vaccine is a thing of the past. It's now September, no vaccine... 16 views 0 comments Post not marked as liked Adama Aug 9, 2020 3 min Pandemic over ? - The new normal It has become quite evident Covid-19 is something that we are going to have to learn to live with. Lockdown measures are being lifted and... 18 views 0 comments Post not marked as liked

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